IMC Intuition

Thinking out loud about all things IMC

Archive for the ‘Strategic Planning’ Category

Why CSR?

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ASM_Camp_16

2016 ASM Materials Camp volunteers, faculty and students @ Allegheny College

One of many activities under the Public Relations umbrella is CSR or Corporate Social Responsibility. There are many definitions, here’s my favorite, “Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large.”*

A perfect example of CSR in action this summer is the combined effort of the ASM Educational Foundation, Allegheny College, Channellock, Universal Wells, SECO/WARWICK, Associated Spring, Peters Heat Treat and Crawford Central School District representative to present Materials Camp – a STEM summer camp for college-bound high school students. This camp is free of charge due to the generosity of these companies, educational organizations and volunteers. Students entering college with a passion for STEM disciplines – Priceless.

CSR programs have a proven record of building brand recognition, improving employee and customer relations and increasing profitability.  Contact me to discover the many benefits of the public relations approach to business; your consultation is free.

Beth Ryan Integrated Marketing & Communications
Public Relations, Content Marketing and Training

info@bethryanimc.com | www.bethryanimc.com

*mallon bakers respectful business blog, http://mallenbaker.net/article/clear-reflection/definitions-of-corporate-social-responsibility-what-is-csr

 

 

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Written by Beth Ryan

July 15, 2016 at 1:27 pm

Where is Your Sunshine?  Understanding Public Relations & Brand Journalism

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Beth Ryan IMCPublic relations is defined as a strategic communication process that builds mutually beneficial relationships. My specialty, integrated marketing communications (IMC) recognizes that in our advertising saturated world, public relations is equally, if not more important as companies can now self-publish in both print and online.  Typical PR tools include news releases, special events, newsletters, public service announcements (PSA’s), editorials, special websites and social media, however, most PR campaigns begin with a news release.

The humble news release, well written with a compelling headline is a business owner’s most effective tool that requires little to no investment other than time and imagination.  To build a meaningful relationship with your audience and the media, you need to think and write like a journalist – this is called “brand journalism.”  In brand journalism, instead of saying, “buy my stuff,” you are telling your brand story by sharing news and information relevant to your business and the industry that you serve.  These stories position you and your company as a thought leader and influencer in your community.

A great press release can be repurposed as a blog, expanded into a white paper, posted to your website, linked to social media, or wherever your customers go for news and information.  If you boost your editorial with an ad, you will get amazing results.  Marketing guru Al Reis famously said, “PR is the sun and advertising is the wind.”*  Find your sunshine today and make it more effective with a burst of wind.

Are you new to public relations practice for internal and external communications?  I can help.  Contact me for your free consultation.

*Reis, Al and Laura (2002) The Fall of Advertising and the Rise of PR; Harper Business

Digital Strategy 101 by Bud Caddell

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This says it all.  Loved the Brief and Tools at the end.  Brilliant!

digital-strategy-101-bud-caddell-130709225509-phpapp01

In Contempt of Clutter

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Clutter is everywhere on the cyber landscape.  Everyone thinks they need a Facebook page, but they don’t know why, they have no plan for the daily attention it requires or measurement metrics in place.

In Gerry McGovern’s email this week, he muses about how marketing and communications people, educated to create content, end up creating a muddled mass of clutter for users to navigate.

Really, how much content is useful?  The most common question that people ask me is how to create content, how to expand into social media and how to budget for non-traditional marketing.  What they really want are tactics without a strategy because it looks good and after all, it’s free, isn’t it?

My answer is to ask more questions:

  • Who are your customers?
  • Who are your prospects?
  • Do you have profiles for them?
  • How big is your market?
  • Where are they located?
  • How old are they?
  • Male, female or both?
  • What are their values, attitudes and lifestyles?
  • Do you have a segmented database for customers, prospects, suspects?
  • What does success look like?
  • Do you use analytics?
  • Do you have your eye on operating systems, mobile and click maps?
  • What has worked well in the past?  More important, what has failed?
  • What are your customers and fans telling you about your inbound marketing compared with your competitors?
  • Have you analyzed your competitor’s inbound marketing?
  • What resources can you commit in terms of staff and budget?

You really have to know all of this before you can begin to create any type of  effective inbound marketing strategy.  If strict maintenance is included in the tactical management portion of the plan, clutter will be kept under control.  It takes research and thought but people really respond to a clean design that is easy to navigate where transactions can take place quickly.   They really hate it when you don’t, and that tarnishes your brand.

All it takes is a strategic integrated marketing plan.

Read Gerry’s post, he is a usability expert:  http://gerrymcgovern.com/new-thinking/communications-and-marketing-professionals-crossroads

 

 

 

Google’s Rich Snippets

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Hubspot had a great blog post shared today on LinkedIn that was a primer on creating rich snippets.  I personally love how they render with such clarity due to their relative size and use of white space.

Check it out, a must read for anyone with an interest in SEO.  The article is entitled “How to Breathe New Life into Your Google Search Results with Rich Snippets”:

http://blog.hubspot.com/how-to-use-google-rich-snippets 

Totally cool.  TGIF!

Links:

Hubspot, Inbound Marketing Software, http://www.hubspot.com/

About Rich Snippets:  http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=99170

Google Rich Snippet Tool:  http://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/richsnippets

 

Simply Brilliant – Olivari’s “One Year of Little” Campaign

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As a rule, I am not impressed with consumer product cause marketing programs, because the cause either doesn’t resonate with me personally, or connect to the brand specifically.  While couponing on Sunday, the Olivari “thanks.” headline caught my eye, and immediately drew me in.  It has it all:

 

"One Year of Little" Campaign from Olivari Mediterranean Olive Oil

Clipped from the Sunday, March 17, 2013 Erie Times NewsCampaign theme lends itself to multiple messages and platforms

  • One word headline
  • Engaging copy
  • Clear line of vision from the message that little things matter to the primary product attribute of quality
  • Direct response coupon in the Sunday paper
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • You Tube (videos went a bit far afield for my taste)
  • Visual website as hub

It’s all in there.  You can clearly see strategy, timeline and audience analysis.

Brilliant.

Links:

Olivari Mediterranean Olive Oil website: http://www.olivarioliveoil.com/

“One Year of Little” Social Media Campaign:

 

 

 

 

Do you still believe in interruption marketing?

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That concept came up in my professional life recently in both B-to-B and B-to-C projects, the opinion that a traditional model of outbound marketing (my message, my voice, in your face) remains the strategic direction of successful brands.  I beg to differ.

Inbound marketing with the website as hub, content marketing, SEO, SEM, social media and mobile have rapidly replaced traditional interruption advertising models…why?  We have changed.  We no longer have the patience, we have work arounds (skip this ad, TIVO, etc.) and we don’t believe it.  Unless it’s entertaining or informative, we really don’t care.

In my view, inbound is fundamental, followed by strategic outbound (direct mail, email, advertising, etc.) What are your thoughts?

“We need to turn advertising on its head. On the Web, the customer is now the advertiser. When they search they are placing an ad. Traditional marketing is about getting attention while web marketing is about giving it.”  Gerry McGovern

Gerry McGovern is a thought leader in web content management.  New Thinking:  http://www.gerrymcgovern.com/new-thinking/problem-trying-get-attention

Update 3/18/2013:  The PR Daily post, “No, PR does not look more like advertising” by Frank Strong offered this additional insight on interruption marketing:

“Promoted posts, click-through news stories, and those annoying mini pop-ups that follow you as you scroll a page are among the latest interruptions. People don’t hate marketing, they hate those interruptions. They’re obstacles that are intentionally placed between readers and the information they seek.

On the Web, attention is a form of currency. I contend it’s better to earn it than try to buy it, which is what PR has always done. This is why marketing, and indeed advertising, looks a lot more like PR. It’s a change I embrace, and recommend other PR pros do as well.”

Let’s face it, interruptions are annoying.