IMC Intuition

Thinking out loud about all things IMC

Archive for March 2013

You don’t have to be a rock star guru to have a great experience in Google+

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What the Plus!  Google+ for the Rest of Us, Guy Kawasaki

Make the time to read this informative and entertaining book!

Last year Google shocked me when they announced that they were going retire iGoogle and replace it with Chrome.  I gasped.  I took a glancing look at Chrome and dutifully created a profile on Google plus, thinking all the while, “I don’t have time for this!”

More news.  If you or your organization want to be relevant in search, you need to be active in Google+.

What the Plus?

So, you can see  I had to buy Guy  Kawasaki’s book,  “What The Plus!  Google + For The Rest of Us.”  Yes, he’s the organic search guy, not your typical social media guy, but as he says Google+ is to social media what Apple is to computers, simply the best place for topics people are passionate about.

The book takes you through a light and humorous journey through Google+ with guest chapters for women and just regular users-you don’t have to be a rock star guru to have a great experience in Google+.

While you’re there – circle me!

Guy’s website –  http://www.guykawasaki.com/what-the-plus/

 

 

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Simply Brilliant – Olivari’s “One Year of Little” Campaign

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As a rule, I am not impressed with consumer product cause marketing programs, because the cause either doesn’t resonate with me personally, or connect to the brand specifically.  While couponing on Sunday, the Olivari “thanks.” headline caught my eye, and immediately drew me in.  It has it all:

 

"One Year of Little" Campaign from Olivari Mediterranean Olive Oil

Clipped from the Sunday, March 17, 2013 Erie Times NewsCampaign theme lends itself to multiple messages and platforms

  • One word headline
  • Engaging copy
  • Clear line of vision from the message that little things matter to the primary product attribute of quality
  • Direct response coupon in the Sunday paper
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • You Tube (videos went a bit far afield for my taste)
  • Visual website as hub

It’s all in there.  You can clearly see strategy, timeline and audience analysis.

Brilliant.

Links:

Olivari Mediterranean Olive Oil website: http://www.olivarioliveoil.com/

“One Year of Little” Social Media Campaign:

 

 

 

 

Do you still believe in interruption marketing?

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That concept came up in my professional life recently in both B-to-B and B-to-C projects, the opinion that a traditional model of outbound marketing (my message, my voice, in your face) remains the strategic direction of successful brands.  I beg to differ.

Inbound marketing with the website as hub, content marketing, SEO, SEM, social media and mobile have rapidly replaced traditional interruption advertising models…why?  We have changed.  We no longer have the patience, we have work arounds (skip this ad, TIVO, etc.) and we don’t believe it.  Unless it’s entertaining or informative, we really don’t care.

In my view, inbound is fundamental, followed by strategic outbound (direct mail, email, advertising, etc.) What are your thoughts?

“We need to turn advertising on its head. On the Web, the customer is now the advertiser. When they search they are placing an ad. Traditional marketing is about getting attention while web marketing is about giving it.”  Gerry McGovern

Gerry McGovern is a thought leader in web content management.  New Thinking:  http://www.gerrymcgovern.com/new-thinking/problem-trying-get-attention

Update 3/18/2013:  The PR Daily post, “No, PR does not look more like advertising” by Frank Strong offered this additional insight on interruption marketing:

“Promoted posts, click-through news stories, and those annoying mini pop-ups that follow you as you scroll a page are among the latest interruptions. People don’t hate marketing, they hate those interruptions. They’re obstacles that are intentionally placed between readers and the information they seek.

On the Web, attention is a form of currency. I contend it’s better to earn it than try to buy it, which is what PR has always done. This is why marketing, and indeed advertising, looks a lot more like PR. It’s a change I embrace, and recommend other PR pros do as well.”

Let’s face it, interruptions are annoying.